tholl075@uottawa.ca

Resources

Professional Reading

Visible Learning: A Synthesis of Over 800 Meta-Analyses Relating to Achievement by John Hattie

  • Experiencing Dewey:  Insights for Today’s Classroom Edited by Donna Adair Breault & Rick Breault*
  • Improving Schools From Within: Teachers, parents, and principals can make the difference by Roland S. Barth*
  • John Dewey- Experience and Education: the 60th Anniversary Edition by John Dewey*
  • Teacher-Centered Professional Development by Gabriel Diaz-Maggioli*
  • Teachers Wanted: Attracting and Retaining Good Teachers by Daniel A. Heller*
  • The ABC’s of Wellness for Teachers- An A-Z guide to improving your well-being in the classroom and out by Teena Ruark Gorrow & Susan Marie Muller*
  • The Big Picture: Education is Everyone’s Business by Dennis Littky*
  • What Does It Mean To Be Well Educated? by Alfie Kohn*

Achievement

  • Better Answers- Written Performance That Looks Good and Sounds Smart by Ardith Davis Cole*
  • Closing the Achievement Gap: A Vision for Changing Beliefs and Practices by Brenda Williams*
  • Building School-Based Teacher Learning Communities:  Professional Strategies to Improve Student Achievement by Milbrey W. McLaughlin & Joan E. Talbert*
  • Enhancing Student Achievement: A Framework for School Improvement by Charlette Danielson*

Advisory

  • A-Z advisory & affective education(1993) by Imogene Forte and Sandra Schurr.
  • High School Advisory Program: the Roosevelt Roads Experience (1996) by Manning and Saddlemire
  • Horace’s School: Redesigning the American High School(1992) by Theodore R. Sizer.
  • The Advisory Guide: Designing and Implementing Effective Advisory Programs in Secondary Schools (2004) by Rachel Poliner and Carol Miller Lieber

Assessment and Evaluation

In Schools We Trust- Creating Communities of Learning in an Era of Testing and Standardization by Deborah Meier*

  • The Truth About Testing: An Educator’s Call to Action by W. James Popham*
  • Great Performances: Creating Classroom-Based Assessment Tasks by Larry Lewin and Betty Jean Shoemaker*

Behaviour & Discipline

  • Beyond Discipline:  From Compliance to Community by Alfie Kohn*
  • Disrupting Class- How Disruptive Innovation Will Change the Way the World Learns by Clayton M. Christensen*

Boys

  • Boys Adrift: The Five Factors Driving the Growing Epidemic of Unmotivated Boys and Underachieving Young Men (2009) by Leonard Sax
  • The Dysfunctional School: Uncomfortable Truths and Awkward Insights on School, Learning, and Education by Michael Reist
  • Boys and Girls Learn Differently by Michael Gurian
  • Raising Boys by Stephen Biddulph
  • What Your Son Isn’t Telling You: Unlocking the Secret World of Teen Boys by Michael Ross and Susie Shellenberger
  • Everything Guide to Raising Adolescent Boys: An essential guide to bringing up happy, healthy boys in today’s world (Everything: Parenting and Family) by Robin Elise Weiss LCCE
  • Raising Real Men by Hal and Melanie Young
  • Boy-sterous Living: Celebrating Your Loud and Rowdy Life with Sons by Jean Blackmer
  • Raising a Modern Day Knight by Robert Lewis
  • That’s My Son: How Moms Can Influence Boys to Become Men of Characterby  Rick Johnson
  • Created for Work: Practical Insights for Young Men by Bob Schultz
  • King Me: What Every Son Wants and Needs from His Father by Steve Farrar
  • Boyhood and Beyond: Practical Steps to Becoming a Man by Bob Schultz
  • Mothers and Sons: Raising Boys to Be Men by Jean Lush, Pam Vredevelt
  • A Young Man After God’s Own Heart: Turn Your Life into an Extreme Adventure by Jim George
  • How Do You Tuck In a Superhero? And Other Delightful Mysteries of Raising Boys by Rachel Balducci
  • Every Young Man, God’s Man: Confident, Courageous, and Completely His by Stephen Arterburn
  • Purpose of Boys: Helping Our Sons Find Meaning, Significance, and Direction in Their Lives by Michael Gurian
  • Bringing Up Boys by James Dobson
  • Wild Things: The Art of Nurturing Boys by Stephen James and David Thomas
  • Extreme Pursuit: Winning the Race for the Heart of Your Son by John Davis
  • I Love You, Son: What Every Boy (and Man) Needs to Hear by Rick Meyer
  • Better Dads, Stronger Sons by Rick Johnson
  • Whisker Rubs: Developing the Masculine Identity by Don Otis
  • I’m Outnumbered! One Mom’s Lessons in the Lively Art of Raising Boys by Laura Lee Groves
  • Boys Should Be Boys by Meg Meeker
  • Preparing Your Son for Every Man’s Battle: Honest Conversations About Sexual Integrity by Stephen Arterburn, Fred Stoeker, and Mike Yorkey
  • Boys! Shaping Ordinary Boys into Extraordinary Men by William Beausay II
  • When They Were Boys by Everett Carroll and Charles Francis Reed
  • I Love You, Son: What Every Boy (and Man) Needs to Hear by Rick Meyer
  • Snips & Snails and Puppy Dog Tails: Celebrate the Wonder of Little Boysby Chrys Howard
  • The Hair-Raising Joys of Raising Boys by Dave Meurer
  • The Adventures of Average Boy: Growing Up Super Average by Jesse Florea, Bob Smiley, Gary Locke
  • What Little Boys Are Made Of: Loving Who They Are and Who They Will Become by Jim Daly
  • The Boy Who Changed the World by Andy Andrews
  • Little Boy by Alison McGhee
  • Plants Grown Up by Pam Foster

Cooperative Learning

  • Cooperative Learning by Spencer Kagan*
  • Positive Interdependence: the Heart of Cooperative Learning, 1992, David Johnson and Roger T. Johnson
  • Joining Together: Group Theory and Group Skills, 7th ed., 2000, David and Frank Johnson  A basic text on group dynamics that integrates theory, research, and skill-building exercises. The text is build on an experiential learning model that requires students to apply group dynamics theory and research.
  • Silly Sports & Goofy Games by Spencer Kagan*

Coaching and Mentoring and New Teacher Induction

  • Achinstein, B. (2006). New teacher and mentor political literacy: reading, navigating and transforming induction contexts. Teachers and Teaching: Theory and practice, 12(2), 123–138.
  • Achinstein, B., & Athanases, S. Z. (Eds.). (2006). Mentors in the making: Developing new leaders for new teachers. New York, NY: Teachers College Press
  • Alliance for Excellent Education. (2004). Tapping the potential: Retaining and developing high-quality new teachers. Washington, DC: Author.
  • Apple, M. W. (2004). Creating difference: Neo-liberalism, neo-conservatism and the politics of educational reform. Educational Policy, 18(1), 12–44.
  • Athanases, S. Z., with Abrams, J., Gack, G., Johnson, V., Kwock, S., McCurdy, J., Riley, S., & Totaro, S. (2006). Adopt, adapt, invent: Induction leaders designing mentor curriculum. In B. Achinstein & S. Z. Athanases (Eds.), Mentors in the making: Developing new leaders for new teachers (pp. 83–95). New York, NY: Teachers College Press.
  • Awaya, A., McEwan, H., Heyler, D., Linsky, S., Lum, D., & Wakukawa, P. (2003). Mentoring as a journey. Teaching & Teacher Education, 19(1), 45–56.
  • Breaux, A., & Wong, H. (2003). New teacher induction: How to train, support and retain new teachers. Mountain View, CA: Harry K. Wong Publications.
  • Bryk, A., & Schneider, B. (2002). Trust in schools: A core resource for improvement. New York: Russell Sage Foundation.
  • BTSA-Basics. (2008). California induction BTSA beginning teachers support & assessment. Retrieved from http://www. btsa. ca. gov/BTSA_basics. html.
  • Bullough, R. V., Jr., (2005). Being and becoming a mentor: School-based teacher educators and teacher educator identity. Teaching & Teacher Education, 21(2), 143–155.
  • Bullough, R. V., Jr., (2009). Seeking eudaimonia: The emotions in learning to teach and to mentor. In P. Schutz & M. Zembylas (Eds.), Teacher emotion research: The impact on teachers’ lives (pp. 33–53). New York, NY: Springer.
  • Bullough, R. V., Jr., & Draper, R. J. (2004). Mentoring and the emotions. Journal of Education for Teaching, 30(3), 271–288.
  • Cassidy, C., Christie, D., Coutts, N., Dunn, J., Sinclair, C., Skinner, D., & Wilson, A. (2008). Building communities of educational enquiry. Oxford Review of Education, 34(2), 217–235.
  • Cohen, B., & Fuller, E. (2006, April). Effects of mentoring and induction on beginning teacher retention. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, San Francisco, CA
  • Colley, H. (2003). A “rough guide” to the history of mentoring from a Marxist feminist perspective. Journal of Education for Teaching, 28(3), 257–273.
  • Conant, J. (1963). The education of American teachers. New York: McGraw Hill.
  • Darling, L. F. (2003). When conceptions collide: Constructing a community of inquiry for teacher education in British Columbia. Journal of Education for Teaching, 27(1), 7–21.
  • Darling-Hammond, L., & McLaughlin, M. (1996). Policies that support teacher development in an era of reform. In M. McLaughlin & I. Oberman (Eds.), Teacher learning: New policies and practices(pp. 202–218). New York: Teachers College Press.
  • Darling-Hammond, L. (2003).  Keeping good teachers: Why it matters, what leaders can do by Educational Leadership, 60(8), p. 6-13
  • Darling-Hammond, L, Amrein-Beardsley, a, Haertel, E & Rothstein, J (2012).  Evaluating teacher evaluation by  Phi Delta Kappan, 93(6), p.11.
  • Farkas, S. (2001). Trying to stay ahead of the game: Superintendents and principals talk about school leadership. New York: Public Agenda.
  • Feiman-Nemser, S., & Parker, M. B. (1992). Los Angeles mentors: Local guides or educational companions? East Lansing, MI: National Center for Research on Teacher Learning.
  • Feiman-Nemser, S., & Parker, M. (1993). Mentoring in context: A comparison of two U.S. programs for beginning teachers. International Journal of Educational Research, 699–718.
  • Feiman-Nemser, S. (2001). Helping novices learn to teach: Lessons from an exemplary support provider. Journal of Teacher Education, 52(1), 17–30.
  • Feiman-Nemser, S. (2001). From preparation to practice. Designing a continuum to strengthen and sustain teaching. Teachers College Record, 103(6), 1013–1055.
  • Fifty-State Report Card. (2010). Education Week, published on line, January 7, 2010. Retrieved from http://www.edweek.org/ew/toc/2010/01/14/index.html? intc=ml.
  • Fletcher, S. H., & Barrett, A. (2004). Developing effective beginning teaches through mentor-based induction. Mentoring and Tutoring, 12(3), 321–333.
  • Fletcher, S., Strong, M., & Villar, A. (2008). An investigation of the effects of variations in mentor-based induction on performance of students in California. Teachers College Record, 110(10), 2271–2289.
  • Fletcher, S. H., & Strong, M. (2009). Full-release and site-based mentoring of elementary grade new teachers: An analysis of changes in student achievement. New Educator, 5, 329–341.
  • Fuller, E. (2003). Beginning teacher retention rates for TxBESS and non-TxBESS teachers. (Unpublished manuscript, State Board for Educator Certification, Austin, Texas).
  • Fulton, K., Yoon, I., & Lee, C. (2005). Induction into learning communities. Washington, DC: National Commission on Teaching and America’s Future.
  • Ganser, T. (2002). The new teacher mentors: Four trends that are changing the look of mentoring programs for new teachers. American School Board Journal, 189(12), 25–27.
  • Garet, M., Porter, A., Desmoine, L., Birman, B., & Kwang, S. K. (2001). What makes professional development effective? American Educational Research Journal, 38(4), 915–946.
  • Gitomer, D (2007) Teacher quality in a changing policy landscape: Improvements in the teacher pool.  Princeton, NJ: Educational Testing Service.
  • Glazerman, S., Isenberg, E., Dolfin, S., Bleeker, M., Johnson, A., Grider, M., & Jacobus, M. (2010). Design of an impact evaluation of teacher induction programs (Final Report No. 6137-070). Washington, DC: Mathematica Policy Research. Retrieved from www.mathematica-mpr.com/publications/PDFs/designimpact.pdf
  • Glazerman, S., Dolfin, S., Bleeker, M., Johnson, A., Isenberg, E., Lugo-Gil, J., et al. (2008). Impacts of comprehensive teacher induction: Results from the first year of randomized controlled study. Washington, DC: Mathematica Policy Research.
  • Glazerman, S., Goldhaber, D., Loeb, S., Raudenbush, S., Staiger, D. O., & White- hurst, G. J. (2011). Passing muster: Evaluating teacher evaluation systems. Washington, D. C: Brown Center on Education Policy, Brookings Institution.  Downloaded by [Portland State University] at 09:59 05 June 2013 MENTORING AND NEW TEACHER INDUCTION 73
  • Gless, J. (2006). Designing mentoring programs for transforming school cultures. In B. Achinstein & S. Z. Athanases (Eds.), Mentors in the making: Developing new leaders for new teacher (pp. 165–176). New York, NY: Teachers College Press.
  • Gold, Y. (1999). Beginning teacher support. In J. Sikula, T. Buttery, & E. Guyton (Eds.), Handbook of research in teacher education (2nd ed., pp. 548–594). New York: Macmillan Gordon, S. P., & Brobeck, S. R. (2010). Coaching the mentor: Facilitating reflection and change. Mentoring & Tutoring, 18(4), 417–447.
  • Grossman, P., Loeb, S., Myung, J., Boyd, D., Lankford, H., & Wyckoff, J. (in press). Learning to teach in New York City: How teachers and schools jointly determine the implementation of a district-wide mentoring program. National Society for the Study of Education Yearbook. New York: Teachers College, Columbia University.
  • Harrison, J. K., Lawson, T., & Wortley, A. (2005). Mentoring the beginning teacher: Developing professional autonomy through critical reflection on practice. Reflective Practice, 6(3), 419–441.
  • He, Y. (2009). Strength-based mentoring in pre-service teacher education: a literature review. Mentoring & Tutoring, 17(3), 263–275.
  • Helman, L. (2006). What’s in a conversation? Mentoring stances in coaching conferences and how they matter. In B. Achinstein & S. Z. Athanases (Eds.), Mentoring in the making: Developing new leaders for new teachers (pp. 69–82). New York, NY: Teachers College Press.
  • Hobson, A. J., Ashby, P., Malderez, A., & Tomlinson, P. D. (2009). Mentoring beginning teachers: What we know and what we don’t. Teaching & Teacher Education, 25(1), 207–216.
  • Howe, E. R. (2006). Exemplary teacher induction: An international review. Educational Philosophy and Theory, 38(3), 287–297.
  • Ingersoll, R., & Smith, T. (2004). Do teacher induction and mentoring matter? NASSP Bulletin, 88(638), 28–40.
  • Ingersoll, R. (2001). Teacher turnover and teacher shortages: An organizational analysis. American Educational Research Journal, 38(3), 499–534.
  • Isenberg, E., Glazerman, S., Bleeker, M., Johnson, A., Lugo-Gil, M., Grider, S., et al. (2009). Impacts of comprehensive teacher induction: Results from the second year of a randomized controlled study. Washington, DC: Mathematica Policy Research.
  • Isenberg, E., Glazerman, S., Johnson, A., Dolfin, S., & Bleeker, M. (2010). Linking induction to student achievement. In J. Wang, S. Odell, & R. Clift (Eds.), Past, present and future research on teacher induction (pp. 221–240). New York: Rowman & Littlefield.
  • Johnson, S., & Kardos, S. (2002). Keeping new teachers in mind. Educational Leadership, 59(6), 12–16.
  • Johnson, S. M. (2004). Finders and keepers: Helping new teachers survive and thrive in our schools. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
  • Johnson, S. M., Berg, J., & Donaldson, M. (2005). Who stays in teaching and why: A review of the literature on teacher retention. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Graduate School of Education, Project on the Next Generation of Teachers.
  • Kapadia, K., Coca, C., & Easton, J. Q. (2007). Keeping new teachers: A first look at the influences of induction in the Chicago Public Schools. Retrieved from Consortium on Chicago School Research at the University of Chicago athttp://ccsr.uchicago.edu/publications/keeping_new_teachers012407.pdf
  • Kardos, S., & Johnson, S. M. (2007). On their own and presumed expert: New teachers’ experiences with their colleagues. Teachers College Record, 109(9), 2083–2106.
  • Kilburg, G. M., & Hancock, T. (2006). Addressing sources of collateral damage in four mentoring programs. Teachers College Record, 108(7), 1321–1338.
  • Lave, J., & Wenger, E. (1991). Situated learning: Legitimate peripheral practice. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.
  • Little, J. W. (1990). The mentor phenomenon and the social organization of teaching.  In C. Cazden (Ed.), Review of research in education. Vol. 16 (pp. 297-351). Washington: DC: American Educational Research Association.
  • Lortie, D. C. (1966). Teacher socialization: The Robinson Crusoe model. In The real world of the beginning teacher: Report of the 19th National TEPS Conference (pp. 54–66). Washington, DC: National Education Association.
  • Loughran, J., Hamilton, M. L., Laboskey, V., & Russell, T. (2004). International handbook of self-study of teaching and teacher education practices. Dordrecht, Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Publishers.
  • McLaughlin, M. W., & Talbert, J. E. (2001). Professional communities and the work of high school teaching. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
  • Moir, E., & Gless, J. (2001). Quality induction: An investment in teachers. Teacher Education Quarterly, 28(1), 109–114
  • Moir, E., Barlin, D., Gless, J., & Miles, J. (2009). New teacher mentoring. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Education Press.
  • Mullen, C. A. (2009). The handbook of leadership and professional learning com- munities. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • New Teacher Center (2008). High quality mentoring and induction practices. Reflections, 10(1), 14–15.
  • New Teacher Center. (2010). Reflections, 12(1), n.p.
  • New York State United Teachers. (2010). The New York state mentor teacher internship program. NYSUT: Information Bulletin, March, p. 3.
  • Papay, J. P. (2011). Different tests, different answers: The stability of teacher value- added estimates across outcome measures. American Educational Research Journal, 48(1), 163–193.
  • Patterson, M. (2005). Hazed!  Educational Leadership, 62(8), 20–23.
  • Public Education Network. (2003). The voice of the new teacher. Washington, DC: Author.
  • Race to the Top. (2009). Retrieved June 30, 2011, from http:www. whitehouse. gov. Reiman, A. J. (1999). The evolution of the social role-taking and guided reflection framework in teacher education: Recent theory and quantitative synthesis of research. Teaching & Teacher Education, 15(6), 597–612.
  • Reiman, A. J., & Thies-Sprinthall, L. (1998). Mentoring and supervision for teacher development. New York, NY: Longman.
  • Rust, F. O. (2009). Teacher research and the problem of practice. Teachers College Record, 111(8), 1882–1893.
  • Robinson, G. W. (1998, October). New teacher induction: A study of selected new teacher induction models and common practices. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwestern Educational Research Association, Chicago.
  • Rockoff, J. E. (2008). Does mentoring reduce turnover and improve skills of new employees? Evidence from teachers in New York City (Working Paper 13868). Retrieved from the National Bureau of Economic Research at www.nber.org/papers/w13868
  • Rosenholtz, S. J. (1989). Teachers’ workplace: The social organization of schools. New York: Longman. Schaeffer, R. (1967). The school as a center of inquiry. New York: Harper and Row.
  • Sanders, W. L., & Horn, S. P. (1998). Research findings from the Tennessee value- added assessment system (TVAAS) database: Implications for educational evaluation and research. Journal of Personnel Evaluation in Education, 12(3), 247– 256. Downloaded by [Portland State University] at 09:59 05 June 2013 p.74 BULLOUGH, JR.
  • Smith, T. M., & Ingersoll, R. M. (2004). What are the effects of induction and mentoring on beginning teacher turnover? American Educational Research Journal, 41(3), 681–714.
  • Shields, P., Esch, C., Humphrey, D., Wechsler, M., Chang-Ross, C., Gallagher, A. (2003). The status of the teaching profession 2003: Research findings and policy recommendations. Santa Cruz, CA: Center for the Future of Teaching and Learning.
  • Smith, T., & Finch, M. (2010). Influence of teacher induction on teacher retention. In J. Wang, S. Odell, & R. Clift (Eds.), Past, present and future research on teacher induction (pp. 109–124). Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield.
  • Smith, T., & Ingersoll, R. (2004). What are the effects of induction and mentoring on beginning teacher turnover? American Educational Research Journal, 41, 681–714.
  • Sprinthall, N. A., & Thies-Sprinthall, L. (1983). Teacher as an adult learner: A cognitive-developmental view. In G. A. Griffin (Ed.), Staff development: Eighty- second yearbook of the National Society for the Study of Education (pp. 24–31). Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.
  • Strong, M. (2009). Effective teacher induction and mentoring: Assessing the evidence. New York: Teachers College Press.
  • Sundli, V. (2007). Mentoring–a new mantra for education. Teaching & Teacher Education, 23(2), 201–215.
  • Villar, A., & Strong, M. (2007). Is mentoring worth the money? A benefit-cost analysis and fiver-year rate of return of a comprehensive mentoring program for beginning teachers ERS Spectrum, 25(3), 1–17.
  • Wang, J., Odell, S. J., & Schwille, S. A. (2008). Effects of teacher induction on beginning teachers’ teaching: A critical review of the literature. Journal of Teacher Education, 59(2), 132–152.
  • Wang, J., Strong, M., & Odell, S. J. (2004). Mentor-novice conversations about teaching: A comparison of two U.S. and two Chinese cases. Teacher College Record, 106(4), 775–813.
  • Wechsler, M. E., Caspary, K., Humphrey, D. C., & Matsko, K. K. (2010). Examining the effects of new teacher induction. Menlo Park, CA: SRI International.
  • Wei, R.C., Darling-Hammond, L & Adamson, F. (2010).  Professional development in the United States: Trends and Challenges. Dallas, TX: National Staff Development Council, p.28
  • Wenger, E. (1998). Communities of practice: Learning, meaning, and identity. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.
  • Wong, H. K. (2004). Induction programs that keep new teachers teaching and improving. NASSP Bulletin, 88(638), 41–58.
  • Worthy, J. (2005). “It didn’t have to be so hard”: The first years of teaching in an urban school. International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, 18(3), 379–398.
  • Young, J. R., Bullough, R. V., Jr., Draper, R. J., Smith, L. K., & Erickson, L. B. (2005). Novice teacher growth and personal models of mentoring: Choosing compassion over inquiry. Mentoring & Tutoring, 13(2), 169–188.
  • Yusko, B., & Feiman-Nemser, S. (2008). Embracing contraries: Combining assistance and assessment in new teacher induction. Teachers College Record, 110 (5), 923–953.

Differentiated Learning/ Instruction

  • Fulfilling the Promise of the Differentiated Classroom: Strategies and Tools for Responsive Teaching by Carol Ann Tomlinson*
  • So Each May Learn- Integrating Learning Styles and Multiple Intelligences by Harvey Silver, Richard Strong, Matthew Perini*
  • Multiple Intelligences in the Classroom by Thomas Armstrong*
  • Adolescents At School: Perspectives on Youth, Identity, and Education by Michael Sadowski*
  • Brain Matters: Translating Research into Classroom Practice by Patricia Wolfe*
  • In Search of Understanding: The Case for Constructivist Classrooms by Jacqueline G. Brooks and Martin Brooks*
  • Integrating Differentiated Instruction: Understanding by Design by Carol Ann Tomlinson & Jay McTighe*
  • Learning By Heart by Roland S. Barth*
  • Resiliency: What Have We Learned by Bonnie Bernard*
  • Schooling for Life: Reclaiming the Essence of Learning by Jacqueline Grennon Brooks*
  • Teaching With the Brain in Mind by Eric Jensen*
  • Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More than IQ by Daniel Goleman

Girls

  • A Look in the Mirror: Freeing Yourself From the Body Image Blues (2004) by Valerie Rainon McManus.
  • The Wonder of Girls: Understanding the Hidden Nature of Our Daughters by Michael Gurian
  • Reviving Ophelia: Saving the Selves of Adolescent Girls by Mary Pipher
  • Surviving Ophelia: Mothers Share Their Wisdom in Navigating the Tumultouos Teenage Years by Cheryl Dellasega
  • The Body Project: An Intimate History of American Girls by Joan Jacobs Brumberg
  • Girl in the Mirror: Mothers and Daughters in the Years of Adolescence by Peg Streep
  • Meeting at the Crossroads by Carol Gilligan
  • Schoolgirls: Young Women, Self Esteem, and the Confidence Gap by Peggy Orenstein
  • The Curse of the Good Girl: Raising Authentic Girls with Courage and Confidence by Rachel Simmons
  • Strong Fathers, Strong Daughters: 10 Secrets Every Father Should Know by Margaret J. Meeker
  • Five Conversations You Must Have with Your Daughter by Vicki Courtney
  • Odd Girl Out: The Hidden Culture of Aggression in Girls by Rachel Simmons
  • Queen Bees and Wannabes: Helping Your Daughter Survive Cliques, Gossip, Boyfriends, and the New Realities of Girl World by Rosalind Wiseman
  • Girls on the Edge (2010)by Leonard Sax
  • 101 Ways to Help Your Daughter Love Her Body (2001) by Brenda Lane Richardson
  • Real Gorgeous: The Truth about Body and Beauty (1996) by Kaz Cooke
  • Packaging Girlhood:  Rescuing our Daughters from Marketers’ Schemes (2006) Sharon Lamb and Lyn Mikel Brown
  • So Sexy So Soon: The New Sexualized Childhood and What Parents Can Do to Protect their Kids (2009) Diane E. Levin and Jean Kilbourne

The following books are annotated by JoAnn Deak, PhD from the DEAK group  (http://www.deakgroup.com)

Self-Esteem http://www.deakgroup.com/resources/docs/self.html

 

  • *Aulicino, Christine and Deak, JoAnn Ph.D. eds. THE BOOK OF HOPES AND DREAMS FOR GIRLS AND YOUNG WOMEN. Shaker Heights, Ohio: Laurel School, 1999. From Jane Goodall to Gloria Steinem, incredible women from all over the world write about their lives and what they want for the females just now entering the world. What really grabs your heart is the letters, poems and pictures of the young girls in response. Grandparents and parents are buying multiple copies for the girls they love.
  • *Benson, Peter L. et.al. WHAT KIDS NEED TO SUCCEED. Minneapolis: Free Spirit Publishing, 1998. The title of the first chapter is the major theme of the book: What Do Kids Really Need? The authors identify how to build external assets and internal assets that will lead to strong self-esteem. Although there are no differentiations made for girls and boys, this is a good overall compendium of thinking about the topic of self-esteem.
  • *Branden, Nathaniel. A WOMAN’S SELF-ESTEEM: STORIES OF STRUGGLE, STORIES OF TRIUMPH. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers , 1998. Branden brings a unique perspective: he works with women in private practice and he also consults in the corporate world. In both areas, his specialty is self-. His focus is more reflective and personal than behavioral. This book is small and readable and can be tackled in an evening.
  • *Brooks, Susan M. ANY GIRL CAN RULE THE WORLD. Minneapolis: Fairview Press, 1198. Simply a treasure of resources and ideas for girls, period.
  • *Burnett, Darrell J. Ph.D. YOUTH SPORTS AND SELF-ESTEEM: A GUIDE FOR PARENTS. Indianapolis, IN.: Masters Press 1993 Practical, practical, practical! Burnett even includes checklist of what to do for everything from what to do to “86 ways to say very good”. Although not specific to girls, much of what is said is relevant for females [but not all of it…].
  • *Chipman, Dawn et. al. COOL WOMEN: THE THINKING GIRL’S GUIDE TO THE HIPPEST WOMEN IN HISTORY. Los Angeles: Girl Press. 1998. One of the “hippest” books on the market! You won’t be able to stop reading and looking at it. Although not technically about self-esteem, every story is saturated with the concept.
  • *Deak, JoAnn. HOW GIRLS THRIVE: AN ESSENTIAL GUIDE FOR EDUCATORS AND PARENTS. Washington, D.C.: NAIS Publications, 1998. In her introduction to the book, Mary Pipher summarizes the book by saying: “She… offers us good original thinking on the much muddied concept of self-esteem. Her ideas are both theoretical and practical and are presented in ways that have implications for actions.”
  • *Erlback, Arlene. WORTH THE RISK: TRUE STORIES ABOUT RISK TAKERS PLUS HOW YOU CAN BE ONE, TOO. Minneapolis, Free Spirit Publishing, 1999. A rare book! One of the few books that jumps right in and begins by giving ways of becoming a risk taker. In fact, the entire book is a proactive approach of what to do. The three sections include: Part one- what is a risk? part two: real risk takers; part three- ready, set, risk!
  • *Girls Count and Marone, Nicky. PARENTING OUR DAUGHTERS [NOT FOR PARENTS ONLY]. Denver, Colorado: 1996. Two thumbs up! Just read this quote: “We believe it is the responsibility of all adults to “parent” the children of our society. This kind of “parenting” does not necessarily involve the day-to-day care of the child, but can take place at a distance, such as being a good role model to a niece…or something as simple as having a kind word for the child who lives next door.” The subtleties of what builds self-esteem permeate this book.
  • *Glennon, Will. 200 WAYS TO RAISE A GIRL’S SELF-ESTEEM. Berkeley, CA.: Conari Press, 1999. The author begins by suggesting that the self esteem literature is mostly theoretical and what is needed is some understanding of what to do to ensure that developing females have positive self esteem. As the title suggests, he goes on to name ways that adults in the lives of girls can provide experiences to enhance self-esteem.
  • *Marone, Nicky. HOW TO MOTHER A SUCCESSFUL DAUGHTER: A PRACTICAL GUIDE TO EMPOWERING GIRLS FROM BIRTH TO EIGHTEEN. New York: Harmony, 1998. Very practical, readable, and most importantly- HELPFUL. Even the title of the first chapter acknowledges that this will be worth reading: Achievement Behavior: Here Today, Gone Tomorrow?
  • *Mauro, Raf. WHEN KIDS ACHIEVE: POSITIVE MONONOGUES FOR PRETEEN BOYS AND GIRLS. Rancho Mirage, California: Dramaline Publications, 1997. Individual girls and boys tell about their achievements. We can learn a lot by reading this small paperback.
  • *McKay, Matther, Ph.D. SELF-ESTEEM. Oakland, California: New Harbinger Publications, Inc., 1992. Not a practical manual or an easy read, but a very thorough look at the concept of self-esteem. Others must agree, since this is the second printing.
  • *Ms. Foundation for Women and Forsyth, Sondra. GIRLS SEEN AND HEARD: 52 LIFE LESSONS FOR OUR DAUGHTERS. New York: Penguin, Putnam Inc. This book was written in response to an overwhelming need expressed to the Ms. Foundation after the annual event, Take Your Daughters to Work Day, They were deluged by calls and letters asking how to develop girls’ confidence not just on one day, but every day. This book is the result of several years and many people attempting to answer that question.
  • *O’Gorman, Patricia A. DANCING BACKWARDS IN HIGH HEELS: HOW WOMEN MASTER THE ART OF RESILIENCE. City, Minn: Hazelden Educational Materials, 1994. With a title like this, how can it be anything but fascinating… and it is! The author looks at women who have survived and prospered inspite of incredible events and life stories.
  • *Orenstein, Peggy. SCHOOL GIRLS: YOUNG WOMEN, SELF-ESTEEM, AND THE CONFIDENCE GAP. New York: Doubleday, 1994. Peggy Orenstein approached the topic of girls and self esteem with her journalistic background. She uses a narrative approach to tell the story of adolescent self-esteem and the difference between how girls and boys are taught to think about themselves.
  • *Pipher, Mary. REVIVING OPHELIA. New York: Ballantine Books, 1995. The classic book of girls and self-esteem in the 1990s. Mary Pipher poignantly paints the portrait of diminishing self-esteem of girls as they travel through the adolescent years.
  • *Rimm, Sylvia. SEE JANE WIN. New York: Crown Publishers, 1999. The author and her daughters interviewed one thousand successful women to try to identify those components in their growing years that contributed to their success. Chapter one captures the reader right away by identifying twenty “research findings”. One research finding is that extracurricular activities are important and sports are listed. Another finding suggests that coping with some pressure is good for girls.
  • *Russell, Anita. SELF-ESTEEM. Winnepeg, Canada: Peguis Publishers Limited, 1989. This is really a book for school personnel: for anyone who deals with children in grades one through eight. It is very organized, helpful and practical.
  • * Thompson, Jim. POSITIVE COACHING: BUILDING CHARACTER AND SELF-ESTEEM THROUGH SPORTS. Portola Valley, CA. Warde Publishers, 1995. When I read the part about “the missing element in most games”, I knew this book would make the list. Not just another book about sports and coaching, it makes you think about how you are shaping the children on your team.
  • *Youngs, Bettie B. Ph.D. THE 6 VITAL INGREDIENTS OF SELF-ESTEEM AND HOW TO DEVELOP THEM IN YOUR CHILD. New York, Rawson Associates. 1991. The summary on the jacket cover says it best: “Children with high self-esteem not only do better in school, studies show they do better in life generally. When parents aren’t paying attention to their kids’ emotional lives and physical whereabouts, the children are at high risk…”
  • *Welden, Amelie. GIRLS WHO ROCKED THE WORLD: HEROINES FROM SACAGAWEA TO SHERYL SWOOPES. Oregon: Beyond Words Publishing, Inc., 1998. The author tries to provide as many female role models throughout history as possible. Included are such sports figures as Babe Didrikson, Wilma Rudolph, Nadia Comaneci Sheryl Swoopes, Cristen Powell and Martina Hingis. Great stories, great pictures of the women, nice clean layout.
  • *White, Julie. BUILDING SELF-ESTEEM IN YOUR DAUGHTER. Career Track Publications, 1995. I’m still looking for this book, sounds good, but I haven’t been able to get my hands on it yet.

Dads and Daughters  http://www.deakgroup.com/resources/docs/dads.html

  • *Ajjan, Diana, ed. THE DAY MY FATHER DIED: WOMEN SHARE THEIR STORIES OF LOVE, LOSS, AND LIFE. Philadelphia: Running Press, 1994. Poignant, yes, but also informative. Loss often sharpens the lens of the impact that one human being has on another. Twenty-five women share their lenses.
  • *Berry, Carmen Renee and Barrington, Lynn. DADDIES 7 DAUGHTERS. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1998. I loved this book! The chapters take the reader through the whole process from pregnancy to birth to choosing a name to father-daughter bonding. It relies on stories and quotes from fathers, daughters and mothers to share some wisdom for fathers.
  • *Bolin, Dan. HOW TO BE YOUR DAUGHTER’S DADDY: 365 WAYS TO SHOW HER YOU CARE. Colorado: Pinon Press, 1993. It was inevitable: someone was going to write a cute, almost-day-of-the-year book of almost-quotes for this topic. Dan did. It will take you a half hour to read, but, you’ll also come up with some neat ideas of things to do with your daughter!
  • *Carlisle, Bob. BUTTERFLY KISSES: TENDER THOUGHTS SHARED BETWEEN FATHERS AND DAUGHTERS. Nashville, TN.: Word Publishing, 1997. All right, so it’s a little hoaky. Bob Carlisle wrote this song for his daughter and it was a BIG hit. He was so surprised by the response of fathers and daughters that he put together this ‘coffee table’ book of pictures and quotes from fathers and daughters. Need a present for someone?
  • *Coulter, Barbara and Minninger, Joan. THE FATHER-DAUGHTER DANCE: INSIGHT, INSPIRATION, AND UNDERSTANDING FOR EVERY WOMAN AND HER FATHER. New York: G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 1993. Good reading if you’re looking for what not to do as a father. Most of the book focuses on issues that are detrimental to daughters. Only the last chapter tries to put together a conglomerate positive model. Worth scanning…
  • *Henry, DeWitt and McPherson, James Alan, eds. FATHERING DAUGHTERS: REFLECTIONS BY MEN. Boston: Beacon Press, 1998. Nineteen passionate and articulate men write about what it means to be the father of a girl. You won’t put this book down until you’ve read it all.
  • *Hutchinson, Earl Ofari. BLACK FATHERHOOD II: BLACK WOMEN TALK ABOUT THEIR MEN. Los Angeles, CA.: Middle Passage Press, 1994. A collector’s item, one of a kind! A book that celebrates black fathers and their impact on the lives of their daughters!
  • *Loomis, Mary E. HER FATHER’S DAUGHTER: WHEN WOMEN SUCCEED IN A MAN’S WORLD. Wilmette, Illinois: Chiron Publications, 1995. Mary begins with her story: how she went through life being a “little soldier” because that was her father’s compliment when she forged ahead regardless of difficulty or pain. Mary went on to look at adult women and how they carried their father’s banner into the world. Fostering success, only part of fathering, but one worth a whole book’s focus.
  • *Marone, Nicky. HOW TO FATHER A SUCCESSFUL DAUGHTER. New York: The Ballantine Publishing Group, 1988. This is one of the few books that mixes some research and some common sense and focuses almost exclusively on what to do as a father. Although I wish it had more up to date research, since there are not many quality books on this topic, it is still a must read.
  • *Rabey, Lois Mowday. DAUGHTERS WITHOUT DADS: OVERCOMING THE CHALLENGES OF GROWING UP WITHOUT A FATHER. Nashville, TN.: Thomas Nelson Publishers, 1994. Divorce, death, totally absent, emotionally unavailable: this book deals with the effects of the absence of a father on girls. Those categories increasing numbers of females and this book shares some wisdom about what to do.
  • *Scull, Charles, ed. FATHER’S SONS & DAUGHTERS: EXPLORING FATHERHOOD, RENEWING THE BOND. Los Angeles: Jeremy P. Tarcher, Inc., 1992. Only seven out of thirty-four chapters deals with fathers and daughters. However, it is a good compendium of diverse authors and varied aspects of fathering.
  • *Sharpe, Sue. FATHERS AND DAUGHTERS. New York: Routledge, 1994. The author summarizes the book very well: “It is not possible to measure the quality of daughter-father relationships, nor to reliably predict their outcomes. This book does not seek to prescribe answers nor make glib general statements but to provide a guided journey through a range of real life father-daughter experiences, which illustrate specific areas of interest or conflict and can provide a framework within which to explore and question our own relationships.” The chapters hit key issues and make you think when you read them: I’d like someone to day that about my books!
  • *Wright, Norman H. ALWAYS DADDY’S GIRL: UNDERSTANDING YOUR FATHER’S IMPACT ON WHO YOU ARE. California: Regal Books, 1989. Mr. Wright approaches the topic like a counselor, which he is. The sentence that first caught my attention was: “Your father is still influencing your life today,- probably more than you realize.” This is not about research data but about looking at patterns of how many fathers have affected their daughters, both positively and negatively

Parents

  • Why Gender Matters: What Parents and Teachers need to know about the Emerging Science of Sex Differences (2006) by Leonard Sax

Restorative Practice

  • Crime, Shame and Reintegration by John Braithwaite
  • Shame and Pride: Affect, Sex, and the Birth of the Self by Donald L. Nathanson
  • Improving School Climate: Findings from Schools Implementing Restorative Practices Edited by Sharon Lewis
  • Conferencing Handbook: The New Real Justice Training Manual by Terry O’Connell, Ben Wachtel and Ted Wachtel
  • The Parade: A Story in 55 Drawings by Si Lewen
  • Restorative Circles in Schools: Building Community and Enhancing Learning by Bob Costello, Joshua Wachtel and Ted Wachtel
  • SaferSanerSchools: Restorative Practices in Education Edited by Laura Mirsky and Ted Wachtel

Safe Classrooms (Social and Emotional Learning)

  • Reaching All by Creating Tribes Learning Communitie by Jeanne Gibbs, 30th Anniversary Edition
  • Discovering Gifts in Middle School- Learning in a Caring Culture Called Tribes by Jeanne Gibbs*
  • Engaging ALL by Creating High School Learning Communities by Jeanne Gibbs & Teri Ushijima*
  •  What Is It About Tribes? The Research-Based Components of the Developmental Process of Tribes Learning Communities by Bonnie Benard*
  • Guiding Your School Community to Live a Culture of Caring and Learning:  The Process is Called Tribes by Jeanne Gibbs*
  • A Healthy Classroom: Emotional Group Dynamics by Michael Grinder & Associates*
  • Building Academic Success On Social and Emotional Learning- What Does the Research Say? by Joseph Zins, Roger Weissberg, et al.*
  • Educating Minds and Hearts- Social Emotional Learning and the Passage into Adolescence by Jonathon Cohen*
  • Journey Toward The Caring Classroom: Using Adventure to Create Community by Laurie S Frank*

Systemic Change/ School Reform

  • School Reform from the Inside Out: Policy, Practice, and Performance by Richard F. Elmore
  • The Learning Leader: How to Focus School Improvement for Better Results by Douglas B. Reeves
  • Letters to the Next President- What We Can Do About the Real Crisis in American Education by Carl Glickman
  • Many Children Left Behind- How the No Child Left Behind Act is Damaging Our Children and Our School by Deborah Meier, Alfie Kohn, Linda Darling-Hammond

Teacher Evaluation

  • Cosner, S. (2010). Drawing on a knowledge-based trust perspective to examine and conceptualize within-school trust development by principals. Journal of School Leadership, 20(2), 117–144.
  • Danielson, C. (2011). Evaluations that help teachers learnEducational Leadership, 68(4), 35–39.
  • Drago-Severson, E. (2009). Leading adult learning: Supporting adult development in our schools. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin.
  • National Education Association. (2010). Teacher assessment and evaluation: The National Education Association’s framework for transforming education systems to support effective teaching and improve student learning. Washington, DC: Author.
  • Peterson, K. (2004). Research on school teacher evaluation. NASSP Bulletin, 88(639), 60–79.
  • Toch, T., & Rothman, R. (2008). Rush to judgment: Teacher evaluation in public education. Washington, DC: Education Sector.
  • Weingarten, R. (2010). A new path forward: Four approaches to quality teaching and better schools.American Educator, 34(1), 36–39.

Technology (ICT)

  • The Digital Classroom: How Technology is Changing the Way We Teach and Learn by David T. Gordon

* can be purchased through CentreSource at http://www.tribes.com/